Tag Archives: Tradiio

Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Tourists



We are loving this month’s Tradiio band, and we recon you will too.

Meet Tourists; a five-piece gem from Torquay, Devon, who effortlessly combine indie pop with elements of electronica and folk.

We had a chat with the band about Torquay, support from the BBC, and what new music they are listening to at the moment.

For those who don’t know you, tell us a bit more about Tourists and how you all got into music.

The writing process actually began a few years ago when Scott (drums) was actively seeking out people to start a new band with. He stumbled on Jamie’s (vocals / guitar) Myspace page and connected with his songs immediately. Then by chance, they met in a local club and got things started. Tom (synth), Matt (bass) and Lloyd (guitar) were in other bands at the time which since split – Tom a psych-rock band, and Matt and Lloyd post-punk revival outfits.

The amalgamation of our styles and influences since coming together as a five-piece last year has been fantastic. It feels like we are a new band, yet we have loads of material in the bag and our sound is now richer and more expansive than ever. It’s exciting.

Describe your sound in three words.

“Dreamy, melodic bliss”.

That’s what BBC Introducing said about us recently. We’ll take it.

Your new single Quiet Room follows the popular release of previous single Cut and Run and is released on 17th June – Tell us more about it.

I think Quiet Room is a sign of where we’re at currently, showing how we’ve developed as a band in the last year. With Cut and Run we wanted to put something out that was going to be an instant hit, something catchy and infectious to engage people and get their attention – It had been over 6 months since our last release. Quiet Room has more depth. It has this weird contrast where the verse – and also lyrically – it has this solemn, melancholy tone, yet at the same time has this big, anthemic, feel-good chorus which people just love when we play it live. We actually had one guy in London come up to Jamie singing the lyrics to him after a gig – There’s no way he could have known them. It really resonates with people.

What is the music scene like in Torquay?

I personally think Devon is thriving with exciting young artists and bands (see Skeleton Frames, Peacock Affect, Sam Piper, Pattern Pusher, Martyn Crocker…).

Torquay itself is struggling to be honest – As I think are a lot of small towns. Sometimes I blame the venues for being short-sighted and not paying bands enough. Young bands need money to develop, buy better equipment, improve their sound. Then they get better, attract bigger crowds, inspire others, and before you know it you’ve started a bit of a scene. But then the venues have to make the money too… And if people aren’t turning up, its not worth them putting the bands on. It’s a vicious circle. I’m not sure what the answer is.

Do you consider yourself Tourists in Torquay?

Haha.. Definitely not. We all grew up here and have been here most of our lives. It’s a beautiful place to be (when the sun is out).

We discovered you on Tradiio. Do you think Tradiio has contributed to the immense response to your music from radio and blog tastemakers, as well as fans?

We like Tradiio a lot. It’s changing the way people discover and appreciate unsigned artists, which is important. The response to our music on Tradiio has been overwhelming from day one. Most of our tracks have reached the top 10 in their global charts which is cool. We actually got our first ever BBC Radio 1 play because of someone hearing our track All We Do Is Pretend on Tradiio. A few weeks ago we launched our Tradiio Circle, which allows our fans to directly support us each month as we try to fund our debut album. For example, if you subscribe for $5/month, you get exclusive access to new unreleased tracks prior to their release, old demos and ideas, and behind-the- scenes photos and videos of what we’re doing, new song ideas, etc. It’s allowing us to be more interactive with our fans, which is a good thing for both of us.

You’ve been working with producer James Bragg. How’s that process been?

Yeah, James is the man. He is the ‘6th  Tourist’. Recording with him is always so exciting as he adds so much to the tracks. We go to him with ideas and he makes them happen x 100. He even cooks us bacon in the morning.

We had our biggest gig to date recently, playing a live showcase for BBC Radio 1’s The Academy. We were pretty nervous before, especially when we saw how many people were there but James turned up just before we played and was the calming presence we needed. He said he felt like a proud Dad after that show – Ironic considering he’s younger than a few of us.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

We like to think we are influenced by everything we hear. I think it’s a mistake to get hooked on one or two bands too much as ultimately you’re going to end up sounding the same – And what’s the point in that.

Jamie loves a good 80’s pop song. That together with post punk and psych-pop/rock influences, it becomes quite an interesting mix.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

Jamie – Radiohead – A Moon Shaped Pool (“It’s a masterpiece”)
Scott – Ulrika Spacek (“I have a thing for a maze of dark sounding, chiming guitars.”)
Matt – Diiv – Is the Is Are (“Such simple riffs but total bliss”)
Lloyd – Deep Sea Diver (“I love the guitar work and the synth tones they use sound great. There’s a really good balance between the two”)
Tom – Lets Eat Grandma (“The depth and maturity of their songs for their age is mind-blowing. They have serious natural talent.”)

‘Quiet Room’ is out on 17th June.

We’ve invested in Tourists. Have you? Listen to more of their songs and support them at tradiio.com/tourists/circle.

Sounds like: Band of Horses, MOTHXR, Tuska, Honne, Tender, BLAJK, Youth Club, FAIRCHILD

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Birds With Fleas

Birds With Fleas

Birds With Fleas

Birds With Fleas is an indie band, who base themselves out of New York.

We had a little chat with the guys. Read more below.

For those of you who don’t know you, tell us a bit more about Birds with Fleas and how you got into music.

Birds With Fleas is mainly me, Matt Siegel (guitar/keys/vox), and Spencer Karges (guitar/percussion/vox). We’re both sort of at the helm, but have been fortunate to have other musicians with us along the way.

Birds With Fleas started when I was a junior in college. I was a music major and had access to the recording studio that was on campus. I wrote a bunch of songs on ukulele and banjo that ended up forming our first album the campfire. I finished the album and went off to find people that could help me play the songs live. The first person I contacted was Spencer because I knew he’d been in bands before, that’s really all I was going on haha.

Spencer and I were in high school choir together for three years and we also sang in a few barbershop quartets together. Spence and I weren’t even great friends but I was desperate for help. It’s really funny looking back at it especially with how close we are now.

After I graduated we moved to Chattanooga, Tennessee and had a couple of great years where we were able to grow. This past January we moved to New York to make a real go at things.

Describe your sound in three words.

Melodic. Thoughtful. Fun.

We discovered you on Tradiio. Do you think free platforms, such as Tradiio, are making it easier for artists to expose their sound to the general public?

Definitely. Over the years we have used a lot of different platforms. There are probably more than a dozen ways someone could find our music online. So we’ve always taken the approach that we want to make it as easy for people to listen as possible, while giving them a way to support us if they can.

Tradiio is great because you listen for free if you want to, but it doesn’t shy away from asking people to support tracks monetarily in exchange for some cool stuff.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

Growing up I listened to a lot of Motown and R&B because my dad loves that stuff, really anything from the 70’s. His favorite artist is Luther Vandross so most of those albums were played over and over again.

When I was younger we really only listened to music when we were in the car. The two records we played most in the car were ELO‘s greatest hit and The Jackson 5‘s greatest hits. I’ve probably heard those CDs 200 times each. If we weren’t listening to that stuff we were listening to the top 40 stations. It wasn’t until high school that I started paying attention to what my friends were listening to, that’s when I really started to find things that were resonating with me.

At first I started listening to things like City and Colour, Dashboard Confessional and Snow Patrol. All of that eventually led me to what I listen to now. Some of my favorite bands these days are Bombay Bicycle Club, Sylvan Esso, Daughter, and Local Natives. All of that has accumulated to what now influences our music.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

Lately the two albums that have been on repeat in our apartment are Sylvan Esso’s self-titled LP and Good Grief by Lucius.

We’ve invested in Birds With Fleas. Have you? Listen to more of their songs and support them at tradiio.com/birds-with-fleas/circle.

Sounds like: Bon Iver, Ásgeir, James Vincent McMorrow, Vance Joy, Snow Patrol, Band of Horses

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview With Britt Daley

Britt Daley

Britt Daley

Britt Daley has been causing quite a stir with her single ‘Move Me’, so we decided to find out more about the songstress from the US.

For those of you who don’t know you, tell us a bit more about yourself and how you got into music.

Music was always playing in our household and as I grew up musicality was highly encouraged. For my 5th birthday my grandmother bought me an upright Baldwin, insisting on lessons. I think my grandmother had this dream of me becoming a concert pianist… the ‘female Liberace’, but that was thwarted when I began performing professionally with the Orlando Youth Opera. I continued piano lessons but I loved to sing so I was taken under the wing of Linda Ronstadt’s former vocal coach.

Describe your sound in three words.

Dreamy. Electronic. Synth-pop.

We discovered you on Tradiio after listening to your track ‘Move Me’, which has received thousands of plays. Were you expecting such a positive response to your debut?

I wasn’t expecting it to garner this much attention because it’s so hard to cut through the noise as an independent artist.  But ‘Move Me’ did pretty well, which I can attribute in part to the blog attention it received early on, Soundcloud shares/playlists, and it’s presence on the Tradiio platform. Super pleased that it reached as many people as it has because it’s one of my favorites.

You’ve also collaborated with Morgan Page. How did that come about?

I was originally connected to the project through Jay and Nick of The Oddictions, who also co-wrote and produced, “Running Wild”.  They heard a song I had worked on with mutual friend, producer/DJ Nicademass, and got in touch with me via Twitter.  Despite the three of us living in the same town we didn’t meet in person until a couple months into the project. I’ve become pretty accustomed to working with other artists and producers remotely, and it can have it setbacks, but it’s mostly been positive because it allows me to work with people from all over the world, which has been truly rewarding.  Many of the people I work with are based in L.A., but I’m also working with a producer based in Portland on my debut solo album, and I have another collaboration with a producer who lives in the Netherlands. There are a few pretty cool projects down the pipeline that I’m very excited about.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

Gosh… where to start… as a kid… Björk, Madonna, Tori Amos, Jeff Buckley, and later rediscovering 80’s New Wave bands like Depeche Mode, Tears For FearsThe Cars, Duran Duran, Pet Shop Boys… (I could go on).

In more recent years, I’ve been influenced by Bat For Lashes, Sia, Com Truise, James Vincent McMorrow, Imogen Heap, Miike Snow, Marina & The Diamonds

I also draw upon influences from my classical and theatrical training… and of course my personal life experiences.  Every song on my album is very personal and each one captures a different moment of my life over the past few years.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

I have pretty eclectic taste and I’m constantly finding amazing artists that might not be very new, but they’re new to me… good music is good music.  Right now I’ve been listening to Kidnap Kid, Tame Impala, Jason Isbell, Nikki Lane, Taylor McFerrin, and Broods… Check out Kidnap Kid – Moments ft Leo Stannard it’s stunning.

We’ve invested in Britt Daley. Have you? Listen to more of their songs and support them at tradiio.com/britt-daley.

Sounds like: Miike Snow

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Empathy Test

Empathy Test

Empathy Test

Giving us a glimpse into their musical world, we chat with UK electronic duo, Empathy Test, and find out whether they are human or really androids.

Why did you start making music, and where did the name Empathy Test come from?

We’ve known each other since we were kids and both come from creative backgrounds. For us, music was a natural progression from other forms of expression like drawing and writing. We taught ourselves to play guitar in our teens and started writing and recording our own songs. Empathy Test came about many years later, after we’d both worked separately on some other very different projects. One day we just finally found a way for us both to collaborate and a style that suited us both. It probably took us a year from then to find a name that worked for the project. We wanted it to say something about our mutual love of Sci-Fi and the influence that it had had, both on the music and the artwork, which Adam does for us. Isaac was re-watching Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner for the fourth or fifth time, when he heard Tyrell say “Is this to be an Empathy Test?” and there it was. It’s what they use in the film to work out whether someone is a human or an android.

Describe your sound in three words.

Mesmerising future pop.

Despite writing critically acclaimed songs, and having a large fan base, Empathy Test remains unsigned. Has this been a conscious decision?

We’ve always wanted to be described as “critically acclaimed” – thanks! Has it been a conscious decision to remain unsigned? Yes and no. Our game plan was always to release two EPs, then an album. The first EP would be a self-release, the second we’d release via an independent. Then, fingers crossed, we’d release the album via a major. So far, so good. Three month’s after self-releasing Losing Touch (February, 2014) we caught the attention of Stars & Letters Records on Twitter. S&L agreed to release our second EP, Throwing Stones in December 2014. A year later, the album is nearly finished and we’re about to start pitching it to labels. We’ve had a few offers already but as we see it, there’s no point in being “signed” unless the label can do something you can’t do yourself. For us, it’s providing us with a much bigger audience than we already have. Once you’ve made a big enough name for yourself, you may as well just do it yourself.

Why did you decide to release a remix EP?

As a place holder really. We’d released two EPs and people were already hungry for more. We needed to record the album but didn’t want to keep people waiting too long. Over the course of 2014 we’d made a lot of new friends in electronic bands and we thought it’d be fun to get them to remix tracks from the second EP. We asked more people than we needed to, in case they didn’t have time or didn’t come up with anything, and ended up with way too many remixes. Then we felt we couldn’t reject any of them so we ended up putting out a ten track EP, which let’s face it, is basically an album.

Stars & Letters said they’d release it and that we should try and get as much press as possible in order to sell more copies of the original EP, so we planned this insane schedule of fortnightly premières for almost all of the remixes. Midway through the promo period S&L informed us they didn’t have the time or resources to see it through, leaving us to finished the promotion and release it ourselves. The irony was, after all that we had a few fans, particularly in Russia, grumbling that we should stop “rehashing our old tracks” and give people what they wanted – an album – or two!

Your album ‘Demons’ is out this year, as well as securing support slots with DE/VISION. It sounds like you have a good year ahead. Are you excited?

We’ve actually changed the name as we’ve dropped the title track, Demons, for the time being. New working title is ‘Shadows’. There’s no release date as yet because we don’t yet know who is going to release it. We’ve started working with German booking agency Pluswelt, which is home to some pretty big alternative acts like Clan of Xymox, Combichrist and Grendel. DE/VISION are on there too and so yeah, excited to be performing with them at their two pre-album launch shows in Germany in April. There’s also some big shows planned for the end of the year and the possibility of a support slot on a European tour too with another Pluswelt band, fingers crossed. So yeah, it looks set to be another big year for us and we are very excited to finally share some new material with you.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

In a nutshell,’80s Pop and Sci-Fi soundtracks, ’90s guitar bands and UK underground dance music. More recently, Black City Lights, Electric Youth, Chromatics, Chvrches, Purity Ring, FKA Twigs, Avec Sans, Gems, Mt. Wolf.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

We both loved The Japanese House when we played with them at Camden Barfly at the end of last year. ‘Still’ was one of the best tracks of 2015; an amazingly well-crafted track. ‘All The Sad Young Men’ by Spector is also up there, and ‘Leave A Trace’ by Chvrches. Two great albums last year were Agent Side Grinder‘s ‘Alkimia’ and Lord Huron‘s ‘Strange Tails’. Guitar music is definitely making a comeback and there’s a lot of very ’90s sounding bands appearing, which we’re all for, by the way. You can check out Isaac’s top tracks 10 of 2015 here.

We’ve invested in Empathy Test. Have you? Listen to more of their songs and support them at tradiio.com/empathy-test.

Sounds like: School of Seven Bells, Chvrches, Purity Ring, The Chain Gang of 1974, Avec Sans, Cut Once

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Amethysts



Amethysts are a female/male duo from Suffolk, UK. We had a little chat with them about music, living in the countryside and BBC Introducing.

Why did you start making music?

Simon: I had very musical parents, they’ve been playing all their life, so I think if I didn’t get into music they’d both be pretty demoralised. I started gigging when I was 11/12 in a few pubs (I didn’t get served unfortunately) and have been in bands ever since.

I remember the first time I heard Clarice sing when we were still at school and being blown away. Since then we’ve performed in a few bands together but Amethysts is the first project where we’ve written together and performed as a duo.

You live in Suffolk, the home of Latitude Festival. Has the Suffolk countryside been a great source of inspiration for you?

Clarice: Latitude is one of our favourite festivals, we’ve been every year for the last 4 years, and we’ve previously played there, hopefully we’ll be able to play there as Amethysts soon!

Living in the countryside is a very peaceful so I think it has influenced the mood of our songs, gives our songs a chilled feel… either that or we’re making noise to rebel against the lack of hubbub outside.

Simon: I have a little home studio where we produce all our songs ourselves. My house is so countryside that our neighbour has sheep in her garden. If you listen carefully to some of the vocal takes you can hear sheep…

Describe your sound in three words.

Harmonies, guitar, synth.

We discovered you on Tradiio. Do you think free platforms, such as Tradiio, are making it easier for artists to expose their sound to the general public?

Simon: Definitely. Social media and online promotion is huge for bands at the moment.

For us things music blogs have been great. All of the reviews that we’ve had and the blogs that have shared our music have really helped us to get things moving. Tradiio is great for new bands, there’s tons of opportunities to get noticed and to reach more people and blogs, such as yourselves!

Your debut track ‘Alone’ was featured on BBC Introducing. How did that come about?

Clarice: It’s as simple as: We sent them Alone earlier this year and it got played on BBC Suffolk and BBC Essex the next day and the next thing we know we got invited into Radio 1 for an interview! It all happened really quick, as you can imagine, we were pretty uncontrollably excited. Alone is actually being played on Radio 1 again this Monday night on Huw Stephens’ show. [correct at time of writing. Alone was played on 23 November]

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

We have tonnes of fav’s – Ben Howard, Bon Iver, Fleetwood Mac, Jimi Hendrix, London Grammar, Radiohead, James Blake, FKA Twigs, we could go on..

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

We’re absolutely in love with Aquilo at the moment and we’re loving Rhodes’s new album. I’ve also had Jamie XX’s album in my car for the last few weeks. Foals new album has got some bangers on it, and we’re both eagerly awaiting new James Blake and new Radiohead. We’re both poised like a cat ready to pounce on some tickets for when Bon Iver and Radiohead start touring again as well.

We’ve invested in Amethysts. Have you? Listen to more of their songs and support them at tradiio.com/amethysts.

Sounds like: OH Wonder, Paperwhite, IYES, Fickle Friends

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Red Emperor

Red Emperor

Red Emperor

Indietronica was founded in Brighton, so when we discover brilliant new Brighton-based bands, we get very excited.

One of these bands is Red Emperor, who we discovered on Tradiio as last week’s artist of the day. We therefore couldn’t pass on the opportunity of interviewing them…

How did you meet and why did you start making music together?

Charlie: I met Nav and Ollie during school and college respectively, and Ed had been a close childhood friend. Nav and I had discussed starting an original, Indie/Rock band for a while so one day, I got us all to get together for a rehearsal and the rest was history! We all had similar tastes in music and similar ambitions so it felt natural.

Describe your sound in three words.

Sharp. Intimate. Infatuating.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

Our influences include: Foals, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Kasabian, Oasis, Haim, Queens of the Stone Age, The Wombats, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds, and Marvin Gaye.

You won a competition to play Blended Festival earlier this year. How did that come about, and what was it like sampling the high life of being a musician?

Yeah crazy story! It wasn’t a competition though. It happened a couple months after releasing our debut EP and music video when out of the blue we received a call from one of the event organisers saying that he had seen the music video for ‘Kink In Your Soul’ on Youtube and wanted us to play at the event! After the initial excitement, we passed it off as too good to be true but next thing we knew flights were booked and we were on our way.

When out there, we were treated like royalty and sharing the stage with the likes of Craig David, Jessie Ware and Kasabian was an absolute honour! We had our own private air conditioned dressing room right next door to Kasabian and hanging out with them was pretty surreal!

It’s definitely been the most exciting show of our careers so far and we can’t wait to see where our music will take us next!

Congrats on being Tradiio’s artist of the day last week. You must be chuffed knowing that so many people have invested in you.

Thanks a lot! Yeah, the amount of support we’ve had through Tradiio is incredibly humbling, not only from the fans and investors, but also the brilliant Tradiio staff too. We’re lucky enough to be heading back to the recording studio on the 12th of November to record a new single and it’s all thanks to Tradiio and those who invested in us. We can’t wait to get some new songs up so we can give something back.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

At the moment we are loving the new Foals album but further off the radar, there’s great new music coming from other Brighton bands such as Tigercub, Cessna Deathwish, Fickle Friends and Varjak. Be sure to check them out!

We’ve invested in Red Emperor. Have you? Listen to more of their songs and support them at tradiio.com/red-emperor.

Sounds like: Foals, Kasabian

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Vaarwell

Vaarwell by Tomás Monteiro

Vaarwell by Tomás Monteiro

Lisbon quartet Vaarwell formed in late 2014 and have been making music and touring ever since. They are currently preparing their first album, which we can expect in late 2016.

After being named Tradiio’s ‘Artist of the Week’, we decided to find out more…

How did you meet and why did you start making music together?

We all studied in the same art school and we were studying music production. Since we were all from the same class, we eventually got to know each other better and decided to try making music together and we think it worked out well!

Describe your sound in three words.

Mellow, Simple, Genuine.

We also discovered fellow Portuguese artist Isaura on Tradiio. Do you think the music scene in Portugal has a lot of offer the rest of the world?

Absolutely! We personally think that the Portuguese music scene has never been better and more diversified. There’s a lot of potential in some Portuguese projects.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

We all came from different backgrounds when it comes to music genre, so our influences vary from indie rock to folk and electronic music, to name a few.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

We’ve been listening to Lapsley, Haitus Kaiyote, Ayelle, Benjamin Clementine and Hippo Campus.

We’ve invested in Vaarwell. Have you? Listen to more of Vaarwell’s songs and support them at tradiio.com/vaarwell.

Sounds like: IYES, Daughter, Frances, Phoria

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Tradiio Exclusive: Interview with Isaura

Isaura by Tiago Costa

Isaura by Tiago Costa

Isaura is an electronic Portuguese musician on the country’s one to watch list for 2015. We discovered Isaura whilst on Tradiio.

Her slow pop jam ‘Change It’ has been produced by Ben Monteiro (D’Alva, Mount Keeper) and it was written and composed by the artist herself.

We caught up with Isaura about writing music in English and her love for a variety of artists.

Why did you start making music?

I don’t quite know how to answer that since it is not something I’ve decided to do. I’ve always loved music and most of all I’ve always felt the need to write and compose my own songs. I think that for me it is the best possible way to express myself, to tell my stories and what is going on around me. I don’t think I could write a personal journal or a book, I don’t have enough discipline for that!, but I really like to preserve memories and write down things I do not want to forget; songs are perfect for that.

You are from Portugal, but you write your music in English. Is there a reason behind this?

I love how Portuguese sounds in songs, it is a beautiful, elegant and mysterious language; but I also think that it has a lot of character and personality and I prefer to hear English in this electronic pop world I’m singing. Besides that, my main influences sing in English and that is also a more universal tool to communicate… I think when you like to tell stories you need to believe that somehow the whole world can actually hear them.

Describe your sound in three words.

Electronic, pop, urban.

We discovered you on Tradiio. Do you think free platforms, such as Tradiio, are making it easier for artists to expose their sound to the general public?

Absolutely. Nowadays almost everyone can go online, use social networks and free platforms and upload songs; for good artists that are strongly committed to work hard and to build a music career it can be good and bad at the same time since you have a lot of things going on and sometimes good artist remain hidden under those infinite gigabytes of stuff and labels will never find them. Platforms like Tradiio act not only as a platform where people can hear music and judge for themselves instead of only hearing what big labels and radio stations choose, it also gives the possibility that good artists can be noticed by labels and hopefully earn contracts. I hope the platform can really make a difference and remain parallel to the music industry.

Where do you cite your musical influences from?

I hear a lot of everything. I do not hear that much music, because for me it can be an extenuating process since I can’t work and hear music or wash dishes and hear music: when I hear music I have to stop everything I’m doing. But I listen to very different artists that can touch me somehow. However, for my work as an artist I go from Jessie Ware, Chet Faker, Honne, Shura, Jack Garrat, Tourist, Haim to Daughter, Disclosure, AlunaGeorge, Rudimental, Flume, Jamie XX, James Blake, , FKA Twigs and so many others.

We love new music at Indietronica. What new music are you listening to?

I’m just like anybody else that loves electronic music: I’m still stunned with Jack Ü feat Justin Bieber.

We’ve invested in Isaura. Have you? Listen to more of Isaura’s songs and support her at tradiio.com/isaura.

Sounds like: Frances, Daughter, London Grammar

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